fingerprint unlocks LastPass on the Galaxy S5

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Samsung’s Galaxy S5
On any other phone, you’d have to type in the master password to access all your other passwords stored on LastPass — including the iPhone, where Touch ID gets you into your phone and iTunes account, but stops there. But on Samsung’s Galaxy S5, all you need to do is swipe your finger across the home [...]

Samsung has added a fascinating new feature to its new 16-megapixel MV900F subcompact camera: You can control the camera’s 5x optical zoom lens, as well as its shutter button, remotely via simple hand gestures. Samsung calls this feature Gesture Shot, and it tracks your hand in much the way face detection tracks your face. Here’s how you use it: You’ll need to set the camera up either on a tripod or flat surface, and stand in front of the lens

Thinking of buying a smaller tablet soon?

The Samsung Galaxy S III lives up to its high expectations: It’s one of the most advanced Android smart phones we’ve seen. This newest Galaxy star is our new top-ranked smart phone on the three carriers on which we’ve tested it

AT&T is set to offer customers the new Samsung Galaxy S 3 smartphone in AT&T stores on July 6th, while customers who pre-ordered a Galaxy S 3 are receiving the smartphone by mail. AT&T is selling the latest Samsung Galaxy…

Some HDTVs now have the smarts to connect to the Internet to stream video and keep users up to date with social-network sites like Facebook.

Based on the latest TVs we’ve been testing in our TV labs, some of the things we didn’t especially like in some of last year’s models—such as fair or poor sound quality and bulky, costly active 3D glasses—are no longer as big an issue with some manufacturers. For example, most of the major brands that offer active 3D TVs , which use battery-powered active-shutter glasses, have replaced the bulky designs we saw in earlier generations with lighter, sleeker glasses.

The Samsung Galaxy S III is one of the most anticipated smart phones of 2012.

Three tablets in our Ratings show how manufacturers make virtually the same device for less money, and what trade-offs—usually minimal—you’ll make when choosing the less expensive tablet. Asus, Samsung, and Toshiba each recently debuted cheaper versions of their tablets, keeping the new ones as appealing as the earlier, more expensive versions

What a relief: We’re happy to see more lower-priced, smaller, decent-performing tablets appearing on the market. Samsung has a new entry for that group: the Galaxy Tab 2 7.0, an update to its original 7-inch tablet. It’s the most inexpensive Galaxy Tab yet, at $250 with 8GB of storage